Thursday, October 19, 2017

straight A student, 22, who wanted to carry out a terror attack in the UK is arrested in police raid just days before he planned to travel to Syria to join ISIS

  • Mubashir Jamil, 22, of Luton, offered to wear a suicide vest and 'press the button'
  • Court was told the 22-year-old wanted to join ISIS to rid himself of 'evil spirits'
  • He became obsessed with 'martyrdom' after surfing web for ISIS propaganda
  • An Old Bailey jury deliberated for a day to find him guilty following a retrial 
This is the dramatic moment a straight A student who wanted to carry out a terror attack in the UK is arrested in a police raid just days before he planned to travel to Syria to join ISIS. 
Mubashir Jamil, 22, from Luton, told an undercover police officer he wanted to wear a suicide vest and 'press the button', the Old Bailey heard at his trial.
He filled out an ISIS application form and offered to blow himself up to bring the 'taste of immense pain' to innocent people on British soil following the terror attacks in Paris and Belgium. 
Dramatic police head cam footage shows the moment officers charged into his house shouting 'stay where you are' and put him in handcuffs just days before he was due to fly to Turkey with Hawaiian shirts and £2,000 cash. 
The once gifted schoolboy denied preparing acts of terror, saying he was hearing voices and wanted to go to Syria to be exorcised of the 'jinns' that were plaguing him. 

After being found guilty today, he was told he would be sentenced next month. 
The court heard how the avid computer gamer became obsessed with 'martyrdom' after surfing the web for ISIS propaganda.

He was snared in encrypted chat with an undercover officer, known as 'Abu Hasan', and counter-terrorist officers swooped to arrest him days before his Easyjet flight.

Jamil, who suffered from periods of mental illness, made contact with the man he thought was an ISIS agent through the Telegram app, the court heard.

He told him: 'If you or some brother you know can put an explosive belt on me and tell me how to press, as soon as possible for security reasons, I can do something in the UK even tomorrow after I find a good target.'

He boasted how he was 'not afraid of violent fighting, getting hurt and tortured and hurting others.'

The defendant, who set up an Argos punch bag at his home to get fit for jihad, went on to say he would 'prefer hijrah (migration)'.

He also said: 'I want them to feel another attack while they're still in mourning for Belgium.'  

The court heard how Jamil shaved off his beard following guidance on an e-publication about how to be a 'secret agent' in a non-Muslim country. 

In early April last year, Jamil, who had never travelled alone before, bought a return flight from Luton to Turkey and stocked up on travel kit, including toiletries from Boots.
He also packed a Hawaiian shirt and other clothing to make it look as though he was going on holiday.
Barnaby Jameson, prosecuting, told the jury: 'This was not so much sea and sun, as jihad and martyrdom, by EasyJet.'  
On April 14 Jamil allegedly asked Abu Hasan: 'Will I have to buy my own guns in Sham?' The officer told him not to worry.

The officer persuaded Jamil to send him a copy of his passport, photographs of himself and even a copy of the boarding pass for his flight to Turkey.

Just days before he was due to leave on April 30, counter-terrorist police burst into Jamil's home on April 27.

At the time, he was on his laptop sending the undercover officer the message 'police alert'.
He told police: 'I want to go to and join Islamic State', adding: 'It's easy to arrest me, a lone person. There are other people here who are dangerous and have access to weapons.'

He also said: 'What will you do when Islamic State reach these shores, they won't be so easy to stop then. And they will come. The Islamic State...you have tried to stop their rise and you have failed.' 

The court heard how the former Challney High School for Boys pupil got A grades in his GCSEs and did work experience at an accountancy firm.

He worked in a local Amazon warehouse to save up nearly £2,000 to travel to Turkey and listed his interests as reading fiction, surfing the internet and physical training. 

He spent most of his free time at the home he shared with his mother, younger brother and younger sister, playing computer games or surfing the web. 

His interest in ISIS began in around April 2014 as he searched for jihadi chants online, but his research deepened from November 2015 as he trawled the web for propaganda videos produced by the terror group. 

Prosecutor Mr Jameson said: 'It was through the internet that the defendant was drawn into a world poles apart from that of the once gifted schoolboy with A* in both the arts and sciences.

'He became a would-be ISIS recruit willing to sacrifice his life for ISIS and indeed the lives of others.

'He turned from a player of video games into someone willing to carry out suicide attacks in this country on behalf of ISIS.

'His preference, however, was to go to Syria and join ISIS as a jihadist fighter.'

The court heard how Jamil scoured Twitter for pro-ISIS feeds, including one which praised last year's Belgian bombings.

Jurors were shown extracts of 'upsetting and disturbing' images and documents taken from Jamil's computer.

Among them was a profile dedicated to a 23-year-old British fighter of Pakistani origin who was shot in the eye and 'martyred'. 

Jamil denied preparing acts of terror but an Old Bailey jury deliberated for a day to find him guilty following a retrial.  

'Naïve' young jihadis who return from fighting for ISIS in Syria should be allowed 'space' to rejoin British society rather than face jail, says anti-terror watchdog

  • Max Hill said was vital to help radicalised teenagers reintegrate back into society
  • Revealed that thousands returning from Iraq and Syria have not been charged 
  • Supporting a terrorist group such as Islamic State is a criminal offence in the UK 
Max Hill QC - seen outside the Old Bailey in June 2015 - said hundreds of Britons coming home after serving under the brutal terror group in Iraq and Syria have not been charged to avoid 'losing a generation' of young men
Max Hill QC - seen outside the Old Bailey in June 2015 - said hundreds of Britons coming home after serving under the brutal terror group in Iraq and Syria have not been charged to avoid 'losing a generation' of young men
'Naive' teenagers who return to Britain after fighting for ISIS should be allowed to reintegrate rather than face prosecution, according to the anti-terror watchdog.
Max Hill QC said hundreds of Britons coming home after serving under the brutal terror group in Iraq and Syria have not been charged to avoid 'losing a generation' of young men.
Around half of the estimated 850 UK citizens who joined ISIS in the Middle East have since returned, according to official figures. 
Mr Hill, the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, told BBC radio: 'The authorities have looked at them and looked at them hard and have decided that they do not justify prosecution, and really we should be looking towards reintegration and moving away from any notion that we are going to lose a generation due to this travel.
'It's not a decision that MI5 and others will have taken lightly.
'But they have left space, and I think they are right to do so, for those who travelled out of a sense of naivety, possibly with some brainwashing along the way, possibly in their mid-teens and who return in a state of utter disillusionment and we have to leave space for those individuals to be diverted away from the criminal courts.'
The comments came a day after EU Security Commissioner Julian King revealed that up to 8,000 foreign fighters may come back to Europe after the fall of Raqqa.

Experts say those who stayed are now likely to head for Turkey in the hope of travelling on to Europe to seek revenge for the destruction of the caliphate.

Tory MP Geoffrey Clifton-Brown criticised Mr Hill's stance, saying: 'We should take a tough approach on this. 

'Protecting against any future terror attack must be the primary concern.' 

Supporting a terrorist group such as Islamic State is a criminal offence in the UK. 

Earlier this week the head of MI5 warned Britain is facing the biggest terror threat of his 34-year career. 

Andrew Parker said extremists are mounting deadly terror attacks with just a few days of planning as the UK sees a 'dramatic' jump in the scale and pace of the threat.

In his annual 'state of the union' assessment of the threat facing the UK, he said extremists are exploiting 'safe spaces' online, hindering intelligence efforts to root them out.

And he issued a fresh challenge to technology firms, saying they have an 'ethical responsibility' to help governments confront the threat.

His stark warning comes after Britain was hit by five terror attacks this year - killing dozens and injuring hundreds more.  

Hate preacher Anjem Choudary is REFUSED permission to appeal against his conviction for recruiting extremists for ISIS

  • Reviled hate preacher was finally jailed last year after swearing an oath to ISIS
  • But he claimed their trial was unfair because of the judge's summing up
  • An appeal judge has thrown out his claims today, saying they are groundless
  • Choudary could still be free as soon as next year, after serving half of his term
Anjem Choudary has been denied an appeal against his convictions after a judge rejected claims his trial was unfair
Anjem Choudary has been denied an appeal against his convictions after a judge rejected claims his trial was unfair
Hate preacher Anjem Choudary has been denied permission to appeal against his conviction for being a recruiting for ISIS.
The 50-year-old cleric and his disciple Mohammad Mizanur Rahman, 34, were each jailed for five-and-a-half years after signing an oath of allegiance to the terror group.
The pair, whose followers had attempted and carried out numerous terror attacks, spread their militant brand of Islam through lectures on YouTube
Choudary managed to evade justice for 20 years before he and Rahman were convicted of inviting support for a proscribed terrorist organisation at the Old Bailey and jailed in September last year.
The pair applied for permission to appeal their convictions, arguing that the trial judge, Mr Justice Timothy Holroyde, had misdirected the jury during his summing up.
They claimed that jurors wrongly thought they could convict them for inviting support for ISIS during speeches which weren't on the indictment.
Rabble-rouser Choudary and his lieutenant Mizanur Rahman were jailed for inviting support for ISIS after a long police campaign to get them off the streets
Rabble-rouser Choudary and his lieutenant Mizanur Rahman (pictured) were jailed for inviting support for ISIS after a long police campaign to get them off the streets
Rabble-rouser Choudary and his lieutenant Mizanur Rahman  were jailed for inviting support for ISIS after a long police campaign to get them off the streets
Today, a panel of judges led by Lady Justice Victoria Sharp denied them an appeal, saying the summing up at their trial had 'contained correct directions of the law' and was 'a fair and accurate summary of the case'.
Lady Justice Sharp pointed out that neither defendant nor any member of the 'highly experienced' legal teams raised the point during the trial. 
Lady Sharp ruled that neither Choudary or Rahman 'has an arguable ground of appeal' and ruled that their convictions 'are not arguably unsafe'. 
Many of Choudary's followers, who included Lee Rigby's killer Michael Adebolajo and suspected ISIS executioner Siddhartha Dhar, are in either in jail or fighting for jihadist groups abroad.
Police do not know exactly how many of the 850 Britons who have gone to Syria were directly influenced by the firebrand cleric but detectives said he was a 'key' figure in Isis's radicalisation and recruitment drive.

But he could be back on Britain's streets as soon as next year, as he will be entitled to automatic release after serving just half of his five and a half year jail term.

Choudary took great joy in provoking the British public with a series of stunts, including one in which his followers burned remembrance poppies and disrupted Armistice Day events.

He also called for Buckingham Palace to be turned into a mosque and paraded a picture of his vision which was made by a man who later fought for ISIS.

His now-banned group, Al-Muhajiroun, became a breeding ground for terrorists, most notably Michael Adebolajo, the radical convert who hacked to death soldier Lee Rigby in 2013.

After a trial which was shrouded in secrecy, Choudary and his deputy Rahman were found guilty of 'inviting support for a proscribed organisation' under the Terrorism Act 2000.

Anti-terror police investigated 20 years worth of material, with over 333 electronic devices containing 12 terabytes of storage data analysed. 

Their trial heard Choudary swore an oath of allegiance to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in an East London pub after the so-called 'caliphate' was declared in the Middle East.

He and his deputy then pressed upon Muslims their supposed obligation to 'make hijrah', meaning to travel to ISIS-occupied lands, the court heard. 





BBC suspends Asian Network DJ over 'lewd comments and racist slurs

  • Tommy Sandhu was one of four colleagues allegedly part of a WhatsApp group
  • The group made sexist comments and homophobic remarks in the chat
  • BBC have  opened an investigation and have taken disciplinary action
The BBC has suspended a star of its Asian Network in a row over online messages littered with lewd comments and racist slurs.
Host Tommy Sandhu, 40, was one of at least four colleagues allegedly part of WhatsApp groups sharing sexist comments as well as homophobic remarks and a derogatory term for Pakistanis.
One of the men in the messaging group allegedly made lewd remarks about Amy Elizabeth Childs, 31, a Radio 1 and 1Xtra producer with aspirations to be a presenter.
One of the men in the messaging group allegedly made lewd remarks about Amy Elizabeth Childs, 31, a Radio 1 and 1Xtra producer with aspirations to be a presenter (pictured)

One of the men in the messaging group allegedly made lewd remarks about Amy Elizabeth Childs, 31, a Radio 1 and 1Xtra producer with aspirations to be a presenter (pictured)
Vile sexist comments were also made about female Asian Network staff, including young assistant producer Amanpreet Kaur.
The WhatsApp messaging platform is highly encrypted and supposed to be impossible to crack. 
These messages were accidentally linked to a BBC laptop where Miss Kaur stumbled across them.
Sources said the BBC has opened a major investigation and has already taken disciplinary action against some of those involved.
It is not clear how many people were part of the secret messaging groups but they included Asheesh Sharma and Kejal Kamani, two radio producers who routinely join Mr Sandhu on air, and a disc jockey known as DJ Sachy.

It is not known if all the men made comments or if some were just part of the groups.
Mr Sharma has been given a final written warning and Mr Kamani has been fired, it is understood. 

DJ Sachy, who has worked at the station as a freelance for years, has been told he will not get any more shifts, insiders said.

Tommy Sandhu, 40, was one of at least four colleagues allegedly part of WhatsApp groups sharing sexist comments as well as homophobic remarks
Tommy Sandhu, 40, was one of at least four colleagues allegedly part of WhatsApp groups sharing sexist comments as well as homophobic remarks

Sources close to Mr Sandhu claim he did not make derogatory comments himself and was simply part of WhatsApp groups where some of the remarks were made.

The London-born host is currently fighting to save his job at the BBC, where he is also an occasional host of The One Show and BBC1’s religious and current affairs show Sunday Morning Live!

He first caught the eye of bosses after being a contestant on Blind Date and later became the voice of ‘Our Graham’ who would tell host Cilla Black about the candidates.

BBC Asian Network staff also used the messaging groups to make vile homophobic slurs, calling one colleague a ‘batty boy’ and another a ‘Gandu’, Indian slang for bottom and a derogatory term for a homosexual. 

They also accused a fellow radio host of being gay, even though he is married.

Embarrassingly for the BBC, the WhatsApp groups were also used to take racist pot-shots at Pakistanis

According to insiders, one of the men suggested they refuse to play any music by Pakistanis on the breakfast show even though the network was set up to cater to all Asian groups.

Another message referred to BBC entertainment reporter Haroon Rashid as a ‘Paki’. When one of the men did some work with Noreen Khan, another BBC Asian Network DJ, they were asked on the messaging group ‘have them Pakis converted you?’, according to sources.

The matter came to light within the last week and has sparked alarm within the BBC. It is still reeling from public and staff anger over the huge disparity in its pay for men and women, and for white and non-white stars.

Yesterday insiders said that those caught up in the BBC Asian Network scandal have been warned not to speak to the press.

Broadcasting union Bectu has also warned members not to discuss the matter.

A BBC spokesman said: ‘We never comment on matters concerning any individuals working with the BBC. Any allegations of inappropriate behaviour would always be taken extremely seriously and would be dealt with swiftly and appropriately.’

The broadcaster has offered Miss Kaur a job elsewhere but she has opted to stay at the station.

The BBC Asian Network costs around £7.5million a year to run and is listened to by nearly 650,000 people a week, according to latest figures. It was nearly shut in 2010 when it was pulling in just 477,000 listeners a week. The station was reprieved on the proviso it boosted ratings and slashed its budget.

Miss Childs – who goes by the name Amy Elizabeth – declined to comment. ‘I just don’t think I can talk about that at the moment,’ she said. Mr Kamani and Mr Sandhu also declined to comment.

How muslims shake hands

If you're unlucky enough to be forced to shake hands with a HATER and BIGOT of non-muslims, here's what they'll do and why they'll do it.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Refugee hotel stay costs council £28K after 10 months

BRITAIN’s refugee system was criticised last night after it was revealed that a Syrian family’s hotel stay while they fight to be allowed to remain in Britain has cost £28,000 so far.

Refugee hotel bill

A Syrian family’s hotel stay while they fight to be allowed to remain in the UK has cost £28k so far
The family of five have been refused settlement status eight times. 
They claim their lives would be at risk if they were returned to  and so have been put up in a hotel for 10 months. 
The bill for their accommodation is costing Staffordshire County Council £700 a week. 
Tory MP Peter Bone said: “If someone has the right to be here or is a genuine refugee then fine. But if they do not they should not be here and should be sent back home. It’s simple. 
“This use of taxpayers’ money to keep people in hotels is ridiculous. This is something we simply have to get to grips with.” 
The father originally came to the UK in 1998 to study international politics but later returned to his homeland and married in Syria in 2006. 
The family returned to the UK in 2014 as refugees during the civil war. 
Staffordshire County Councillor Mark Sutton said: “We have a legal duty to protect children and keep them with their parents when their families cannot access public funds. 
“Previous legal advice told us we couldn’t use private rented properties so we have always used hotels.”

Met Say Charging Shoplifters, Vandals ‘Not Practical’ as Arrests for ‘Offensive’ Comments Rise 53 Per Cent



Deputy Assistant Commissioner Mark Simmons claimed that giving up on investigating many offences was necessary so police constables’ efforts could be “focused on serious crime and cases where there is a realistic chance that we will be able to solve it.”
The move has raised eyebrows among members of the public, considering recent reportsthat the Met detained 867 out of the 3,395 people known to have been arrested for “offensive” online comments under the Malicious Communications Act in 2016 — an increase of 53 per cent for the force area since 2014.
Around half of these investigations ended up having to be dropped across the UK, which critics have taken as indicating police are being overzealous in their attempts to take on so-called trolls.
This process of paring back investigations has, in fact, been going on for years. Sir Peter Fahy, then Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police, admitted that his force did not “actively pursue” six out of every ten crime reports as far back as 2013.
As long ago as 2007-2008 police in Nofolk were ‘screening out’ 23,124 of 55,686 reported crimes — 41.69 per cent — including 57 per cent of theft from motor vehicles and 55 per cent of non-dwelling burglaries.
Crimes would be ‘screened out’ by the call centre staff members of the public initially spoke to, if they did not feel the reports met certain ‘solvability criteria’ — CCTV footage, good forensic footage, etc.
The effective tolerance of so-called low-level crime by the National Police Chiefs Council in the UK contrasts sharply with the attitude of the more effective police forces in the U.S., which have adopted the ‘broken windows’ model which emphasises robust action against seemingly minor crimes which ultimately lead to increased general disorder.
Official statistics on crime in Britain are a mixed bag, with crimes recorded by police having seen their largest annual surge in a decade in the twelve months to 2016, with a particularly sharp rise in violent crime.
Crime Survey responses have been used to make the contrasting claim that it is in fact down by 69 per cent since 1995 —
but the Police Federation has complained that the Crime Survey gives a “false picture” of the situation which is “highly miselading to the public”